SPACE 2020! The Universe and (our home planet) EARTH

SPACE 2020! The Universe and (our home planet) EARTH 

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“Picture a bright blue ball just spinning, spinning free
Dizzy with eternity
Paint it with a skin of sky, brush in some clouds and sea
Call it home for you and me
A peaceful place, or so it looks from space
A closer look reveals the human race
Full of hope, full of grace, is the human face
But afraid we may lay our home to waste”
– Grateful Dead “Throwing Stones”

NOTE: CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL!

Meteor Showers

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January 3-4, Quadrantid meteor shower peak: A meteor shower January 1-5. The Quadrantids produce up to 40 shooting stars an hour at the peak; but in 2020, there may be up to 100 meteors an hour during the Jan. 3-4 peak. The first-quarter moon sets just after midnight, leaving dark skies for optimum viewing conditions.

April 22-23, Lyrid meteor shower peak: This meteor shower April 16-25. The Lyrids reliably produce 20 meteors an hour, sometimes with bright dust trails for several seconds. A relatively new moon will make for dark skies. Best viewing time is after midnight. The meteors radiate from the constellation Lyra but can be seen anywhere in the sky.

May 6-7, Eta Aquarid meteor shower peak: This meteor shower from April 19-May 28 produces up to 30 meteors an hour at its peak. Unfortunately, a supermoon will wash out all but the brightest meteors, though patience may be rewarded for those who seek out dark skies after midnight. The constellation Aquarius is the radiant point, but meteors are visible anywhere in the sky.

July 28-29, Delta Aquarid meteor shower peak: Produced by debris left behind by the Marsden and Kracht comets, this meteor shower produces about 20 meteors an hour July 12-Aug. 23. A second-quarter moon will wash out some of the faintest meteors. The meteors radiate from the constellation Aquarius but are visible anywhere in the sky.

August 12-13, Perseid meteor shower: If you can catch only one meteor shower in 2020, make it the Perseids, which produce up to 60 shooting stars an hour at the peak. The shower runs July 17-Aug. 24. A second-quarter moon will wash out some of the faintest meteors. The Perseids fly mainly after midnight and can be seen anywhere in the sky, though they radiate from the constellation Perseus.

October 7, Draconid meteor shower peak: The Draconids are a minor meteor shower with only about 10 shooting stars an hour; but occasionally, Draco the Dragon — the radiant point of the Draconids — breathes fire, and an outburst occurs. The shower runs October 6-10. Unlike other meteor showers, the peak viewing time is in the early evening hours. A second-quarter moon means viewing conditions should be good.

October 21-22, Orionid meteor shower peak: The Orionids run Oct 2-Nov. 7, and produce about 20 meteors an hour at the shower’s peak. Viewing is best after midnight, and a crescent moon will set before then. Produced by dust grains left behind by the comet Halley, the meteors appear to radiate from the constellation Orion but can be seen anywhere in the sky.

November 4-5, Taurid meteor shower peak: The Taurids are active for longer than any other meteor shower of the year Sept 7-Dec. 10. The Taurids produceonly about five to 10 meteors an hour. What makes this shooting star show unusual is that the meteors come from separate debris streams — dust grains left behind Asteroid 2004 TG10 and debris from Comet 2P Encke. A first-quarter moon at the shower’s peak may block out all but the brightest meteors. After midnight is the best time to look for meteors, which radiate from the constellation Taurus but can be seen anywhere in the sky.

November 17-18, Leonid meteor shower peak: This average shower, produced by dust grains from the comet Tempel-Tuttle, runs Nov. 6-30 and produces about 15 meteors an hour at its peak. It’s unpredictable, though, and produces hundreds of meteors an hour during cyclonic peaks, which occur about every 33 years. That last happened in 2001, so don’t expect a cyclonic flurry this time. The best time to watch for Leonids is after midnight, and the crescent moon will already have set, leaving dark skies. The meteors radiate from the constellation Leo but are visible anywhere in the sky.

December 13-14, Geminid meteor shower peak: The only thing the Perseids have over the Geminids is that they occur in the summer when it’s comfortable to be outside. The Geminids, which run Dec. 7-17 every year, are known to produce up to 120 multicolored meteors at their peak. Produced by debris left behind by the asteroid 3200 Phaethon, this shower is best viewed after midnight. A nearly new moon will make for excellent viewing conditions. The meteors radiate from the constellation Gemini but are visible anywhere in the sky.

December 21-22, Ursid meteor shower: This minor meteor shower runs Dec. 17-25 and produces around five to 10 meteors at the peak. Viewing conditions are best after midnight. The first-quarter moon sets just after midnight, so dark skies will enhance meteor viewing. The meteors come from the constellation Ursa Minor but can be seen anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moons, Supermoons, Lunar Events

January 10, full moon and penumbral lunar eclipse:
Native American tribes called the first full moon of the year the “Wolf Moon”. It is also called the “Old Moon” and the “Moon After Yule”. A penumbral lunar eclipse (when the moon passes through the Earth’s partial shadow, or penumbra) will occur on January 10 but won’t be visible in the United States.

February 9, full moon and Supermoon:
The first of four 2020 Supermoons (moons that appear to be larger and brighter when they get closest to Earth). Heavy snow fell at this time of year, so they called it either the “Snow Moon” or the “Hunger Moon” because hunting was difficult.

March 9, full moon and Supermoon:
The second of the four 2020 Supermoons. It heralds the approach of spring. Native American tribes called it the “Worm Moon” to mark the time of year earthworms began working their way out of the newly thawed ground. It’s also called the “Crow Moon”, the “Crust Moon”, the “Sap Moon, and the “Lenten Moon”.

April 8, full moon and Supermoon:
The third of the four 2020 Supermoons is called the “Pink Moon” because it’s the time of year when wild pink ground phlox reappeared. The first full moon after the spring equinox is also called the “Sprouting Grass Moon”, the “Growing Moon” and the “Egg Moon”. Some coastal Native American tribes called it the “Fish Moon” to mark the time of year when they swim upstream to spawn.

May 7, full moon and Supermoon:
The last of four consecutive Supermoons of 2020. Native American tribes called it the “Flower Moon”. It’s also called the “Corn Planting Moon” and the “Milk Moon”.

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Supermoon!

June 5, full moon:
Native American tribes called this the “Strawberry Moon” to signal the ripening of the sweet fruit. It is also called the “Rose Moon” and the “Honey Moon”.

July 5, full moon and penumbral lunar eclipse:
Native American tribes called it the “Buck Moon” because it’s when male deer begin growing antlers. It’s also called the “Thunder Moon” and the “Hay Moon”. And a penumbral lunar eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America and South America, the eastern Pacific Ocean and western Atlantic ocean. This type of eclipse happens when the moon passes through the Earth’s partial shadow, called a penumbra, and the moon darkens slightly.

August 3, full moon:
Native American tribes called it the “Sturgeon Moon” because the large fish found in the Great Lakes and other major lakes were easier to catch at this time of the year. It is also called the “Green Corn Moon” and the “Grain Moon”.

September 2, full moon:
Native American tribes called it the “Corn Moon” because it signaled the time to begin corn harvests.

October 1, full moon:
This year the October full moon is also a “Harvest Moon”. It always occurs closest to the September Equinox. Native American tribes called it the “Hunter’s Moon”, because it’s the time of year when the game was fat and ready to be hunted. It is also called the “Travel Moon” and the “Blood Moon”.

October 31, full moon and a “Blue Moon”:
There’s a “Blue Moon” (the second full moon in the same month) on Halloween in 2020.

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“Blue Moon you saw me standing alone, 
Without a dream in my heart
Without a love of my own”

November 30, full moon and penumbral lunar eclipse:
It is called the “Beaver Moon” by Native American tribes who trapped and hunted beaver before the swamps and rivers froze. It’s also called the “Frosty Moon” and the “Hunter’s Moon”. November’s full moon occurs as it passes through the Earth’s partial shadow, or penumbra. During this type of eclipse the moon darkens slightly.

December 30, full moon:
Native Americans called it the “Cold Moon”. It’s also called the “Moon Before Yule” and the “Long Night’s Moon”.

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Equinoxes And Solstices

March 20, first day of Spring:
During the Vernal (Spring) Equinox, the sun shines directly on the equator and there are nearly equal amounts of day and night.

June 22, first day of Summer:
Summer Solstice is the longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere when the North Pole is directly over the Tropic of Cancer.

September 22, first day of Fall:
The Autumnal Equinox occurs when the sun shines directly on the equator and there are nearly equal amounts of day and night around the world.

December 21, first day of Winter:
Winter Solstice is the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere when the South Pole is directly over the Tropic of Capricorn.

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Planetary Events

February 10, Mercury at its greatest eastern elongation: The planet is 18.2 degrees from the sun, and will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. See the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.
March 24, Mercury at its greatest western elongation: Mercury will be at its highest point above the eastern horizon just before sunrise.
March 24, Venus at its greatest eastern elongation: Venus will make its closest approach to the sun, and will be at its highest point above the western horizon after sunset.
June 4, Mercury at its greatest eastern elongation: Mercury will again be close to the sun. Look for it low in the western sky just after sunset.
July 14, Jupiter at opposition: Jupiter is a giant planet, and when it makes its closest approach to the Earth, its face is fully illuminated by the sun. Jupiter is never brighter than at this time of year, making it an ideal time to view and photograph the planet and its moons. You’ll be able to see Jupiter all night, and a medium-size telescope should be powerful enough to reveal some of the details in the planet’s cloud zone. The moons should be visible through a good pair of binoculars.
July 20, Saturn at opposition: See Saturn’s ring and a few of its brightest moons with a medium-size or larger telescope when the planet makes its closest approach to Earth and it will be fully illuminated by the sun.
July 22, Mercury at its greatest western elongation: Mercury will be at its highest point above the horizon in the eastern sky just before sunrise.
August 13, Venus at its greatest western elongation: Venus will be at its highest point above the eastern sky horizon just before sunrise.
September 11, Neptune at opposition: Neptune will be fully illuminated by the sun, and will be brighter than at any other time of the year. You’ll need a powerful telescope to see it as more than a tiny blue dot. It will be visible all night.
October 1, Mercury at its greatest eastern elongation: Mercury will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.
October 13, Mars at opposition: Mars makes its closest approach to Earth, and it will be illuminated by the sun and the planet will be brighter than at any other time of the year and will be visible all night.
October 31, Uranus at opposition: Uranus will make its closest approach to Earth on Halloween, and it will be illuminated by the sun. Brighter than at any other night of the year, and will be visible all night. If you want to see it, you’ll need a powerful telescope.
November 10, Mercury at its greatest western elongation: Mercury’s last close appearance of the year. Look for it low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.
December 21, rare conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn: These two planets appear within 7 arc minutes of each other, known as a “Great Conjunction” (last happened in 2000). They’ll be so close they will appear as one bright planet. Look to the western sky just after sunset to view it.

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“We have not inherited the earth from our fathers, we are borrowing it from our children.” ~ Native American saying

NOTE: Ripped from patch.com and re-edited.
From Seaandsky.org, NASA.gov, Space.com and Earthsky.org

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Satellites to stars, NASA information, astronomy, the Sun and the planets!

NOTE: CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL!

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The Galaxy Song by Monty Python
Whenever life gets you down, Mrs. Brown,
And things seem hard or tough,
And people are stupid, obnoxious or daft,
And you feel that you’ve had quite eno-o-o-o-o-ough,
Just remember that you’re standing on a planet that’s evolving
And revolving at 900 miles an hour.
It’s orbiting at 19 miles a second, so it’s reckoned,
The sun that is the source of all our power.
Now the sun, and you and me, and all the stars that we can see,
Are moving at a million miles a day,
In the outer spiral arm, at 40, 000 miles an hour,
Of a galaxy we call the Milky Way.
Our galaxy itself contains a hundred billion stars;
It’s a hundred thousand light-years side to side;
It bulges in the middle sixteen thousand light-years thick,
But out by us it’s just three thousand light-years wide.
We’re thirty thousand light-years from Galactic Central Point,
We go ’round every two hundred million years;
And our galaxy itself is one of millions of billions
In this amazing and expanding universe.

apolo

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We previously shared a Blog Post that was very similar to this one!



 

“Space, The Final Frontier” Meteor Showers in 2017, a Schedule & Guide

“Space, The Final Frontier”
Meteor Showers 2017 Schedule & Guide
(ripped and edited, posted on December 13, 2016)

The Ursids meteor shower peaks on Thursday, December 22, and will produce about five to 10 meteors an hour. The meteor shower runs from December 17-25, 2016.

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The Phases of the Moon

2017 Meteor Shower Guide

January 3-4 Quadrantids meteor shower will produce 40 shooting stars an hour at its peak. Believed to be produced by dust grains left behind by an extinct comet known as 2003 EH1, runs annually from January 1-5. Best viewing times are shortly after midnight. Meteors radiate from the constellation Bootes, but visible from anywhere in the sky.

April 22-23 Lyrids meteor shower is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thrasher. Discovered in 1861, the Lyrids is an average meteor shower producing about 20 meteors an hour. It originates from the constellation Lyra, but visible from anywhere in the sky. The crescent moon shouldn’t cause too much of a problem during the shower’s peak. The best viewing time for this shower is after midnight.

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May 6-7 Eta Aquarids meteor shower favors the Southern Hemisphere. About 60 shooting stars an hour will be visible there and the Northern Hemisphere could see 30 an hour. The shower runs from April 19-May 28, but peaks on the night of May 6 and morning of May 7. A waxing gibbous moon could block out the most distant meteors but you should still be able to see the brighter ones. Meteors in this shower radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but will be visible anywhere in the sky.

July 28-29 Delta Aquarids meteor shower: Radiating from the constellation Aquarius but visible anywhere from the sky, this meteor shower produces about 20 meteors an hour at its peak. It runs from July 12-August 13. A crescent moon will have set by midnight, leaving dark skies for the early morning show.

apolo

Walkin’ On the Moon!

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August 12-13 Perseids meteor shower is produced by the comet Swift-Tuttle and it usually produces about 60 meteors per hour. The Perseids are known for producing a large number of blazing bright meteors. The shower runs from July 17-August 24, overlapping some with the Delta Aquarids. It is best seen late at night or in the early morning of the peak dates of August 12-13. There’s a waning gibbous moon that could block out the fainter meteors, but the Perseids are so bright that you should still plan on catching the show. The meteors radiate from the constellation Perseus, but will be visible anywhere in the sky.

October 7 Draconids meteor shower is produced by the dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner. Discovered in 1900, the Draconids radiate from the constellation Draco, but are visible anywhere in the sky. This show produces only about 10 meteors an hour unless “Draco the Dragon breathes fire” (in rare instances Draco can fire off hundreds of meteors in a single hour). The nearly full moon will block all but the brightest meteors, and unlike other meteor showers, the best viewing time is in the early evening. The Draconids shower runs from October 6-10 and peaks on October 7.

October 21-22 Orionids meteor shower runs annually from October 2-November 7 and peaks the nights of October 21 & 22. It produces about 20 meteors per hour at its peak. Produced by dust grains left behind from the ancient comet Halley and it originates from the constellation Orion, but visible anywhere in the sky. A crescent moon will set early in the evening, leaving dark skies ideal for viewing. The best time to watch is after midnight.

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Orion, the Hunter

November 4-5 Taurids meteor shower is long-running from September 7-December 10, and there are two parts: the South Taurids which peak November 4-5 and the North Taurids which peak November 11-12. The North Taurids originate from dust grains left behind by the Asteroid 2004 TG10. The South Taurids are the result of debris from Comet EP Encke. A full moon on November 4 will ruin the show and by November 11-12 viewing conditions will improve. These slow-moving meteors radiate from the constellation Taurus, but are visible anywhere in the sky.

November 17-18 Leonids meteor shower runs annually from November 6-30. It will only produce about 15 meteors an hour at its peak on the night of November 17 and morning of November 18, but every 33 years it has a cyclonic peak that results in hundreds of meteors an hour. The last time this happened was in 2001 so it won’t happen again until 2034. Produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle and discovered in 1865, the meteors radiate from the constellation Leo and are visible anywhere in the sky. There’s a new moon and skies should be dark enough for a good show. The best time to watch is after midnight.

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December 13-14 Geminids meteor shower will outshine the Perseids. Running annually from December 7-17, it peaks the night of December 13 and morning of December 14, when it could produce up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour! Produced by debris dust from the 3200 Phaethon asteroid, it was discovered in 1982. A waning crescent moon should allow for an excellent show. The best time to watch is after midnight. The shooting stars radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

December 21-22 Ursids meteor shower is produced by dust grains from the comet Tuttle. Discovered in 1790, this shower runs annually from December 17-25 and peaks on the night of December 21. It’s a minor shower producing about 5-10 shooting stars an hour. The crescent moon will set early leaving dark skies. The best time to watch is just after midnight. Meteors radiating from the constellation Ursa Minor are visible anywhere in the sky.

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“Space, The Final Frontier”

“Don’t you know that you are a shooting star
And all the world will love you just as long, as long as you are?”
~ Bad Company “Shooting Star”

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The Planets of the Sol System

The Planets:
Mercury, Venus, Earth, (Moon), Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune (and Pluto)

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The Planets of the Sol System

 

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UPDATED 12-26-16:
2017 FULL MOONS & OTHER CELESTIAL EVENTS

January 12 Full Moon (the “Wolf Moon”, “Old Moon” or “Moon After Yule”)

February 11 Full Moon (the “Snow Moon” or “Hunger Moon”)

March 12 Full Moon (the “Worm Moon”, “Crow Moon”, “Crust Moon” or “Sap Moon”)

March 20 Spring Equinox

April 11 Full Moon (the “Pink Moon”, “Growing Moon” or “Egg Moon”)

May 10 Full Moon (the “Flower Moon”, “Corn Planting Moon” or “Milk Moon”)

June 9 Full Moon (the “Strawberry Moon”, “Rose Moon” or “Honey Moon”)

June 21 Summer Solstice

July 9 Full Moon (the “Buck Moon”, “Thunder Moon” or “Hay Moon”)

August 7 Full Moon (the “Sturgeon Moon”, “Green Corn Moon” or “Grain Moon”)
Partial Lunar Eclipse (visible in east Africa, central Asia, the Indian Ocean & Australia)

August 21 Total Solar Eclipse First total solar eclipse of the 21st century for the United States, the first visible in the continental US since February 26, 1979 and there won’t be another until 2024! Total eclipse will be visible in parts of Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, North and South Carolina – rest of the US will see a partial eclipse

September 6 Full Moon (the “Corn Moon” or “Harvest Moon”)

September 22 Autumnal Equinox

October 5 Full Moon (the “Hunter’s Moon”, “Travel Moon” or “Blood Moon”)

November 4  Full Moon (the “Beaver Moon” or “Frosty Moon”)

November 13 Conjunction of Venus & Jupiter

December 3  Full Moon – Supermoon (the “Cold Moon”)

December 21 Winter Solstice

 

01-MAY-13: Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel – Century City, California (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

The Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel in Century City is a landmark 19-story luxury hotel forming a sweeping crescent design fronting the spectacular fountains on Avenue of the Stars, adjacent to the twin Century Plaza Towers and the CAA building.

The Century Plaza Hotel, designed by Minoru Yamasaki, opened its doors on June 1, 1966 on the former backlot of 20th Century Fox Studios.  At the time it was the highest building on the hill and the Presidential Suite looked all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

Here are some more pictures of this magnificent property:

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel – Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel – Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel – Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel – Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel – Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel – Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel – Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel – Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel – Century City, CA (copyright 2013 JoshWillTravel)

Hyatt Master Travel Specialist

Contact me at joshwilltravel@yahoo.com for all your travel questions!

I’m a Hyatt Master Travel Specialist!

Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel – 2025 Avenue of the Stars, Century City, CA

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